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Claire Martin-Tellis --- Copy Editor, Uncategorized

Claire Martin-Tellis: Workshops

 

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Workshop #1

Who: Barbara Kingsley-Wilson, California State University

What: Interview Anybody About Anything

Where: Pacific H, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 9 a.m.

The presentation was a PowerPoint on the do’s, don’ts and golden rules of interviewing. Kingsley discussed strategies for note taking and interviewing, offered tips for tackling difficult or adversarial interviews and gave advice on what to do if unprepared.

For successful note taking, Kingsley stressed the importance of recording the discussion and jotting down key points, which leaves more time to write observations. Good note taking in an interview also requires curiosity and the hunger to learn. In order to get good information and get the subject comfortable, you want to connect with them like they’re the only person in the room, she said.

No. 1 Take-Away: Tell the sources what you want: “I need you to walk me through this,” or “I need you to confirm this.” Kingsley talked about how important it is to explain the point of the story and exactly what you’re hoping to learn or accomplish to your interviewee. Sources will be more willing to share and answer your questions if they have a direction.

No. 2 Take-Away: For hard interviews (her example being one that you’re not necessarily prepared for) follow the GOSS acronym.

 

Goal: ask the source about their goals for the project/topic/issue/future goals etc.

Obstacle: Ask the source about their obstacles in accomplishing their goals.

Solution: solutions on tackling those obstacles

Start: people love to talk about how they started, and they usually remember the light bulb that went off when they realized that wanted to work on that project, tackle that issue, or study that major. Ask them about how they got started.

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Workshop #2

Who: Lucia Villa, San Francisco Chronicle

What: Full Stack Journalist: How You Can Do It All

Where: Pacific N, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 10 a.m.

 

Villa’s presentation focused on helpful tools for visual journalism. He provided the audience with around 10 websites and resources for more efficient and better quality visuals to help all types of journalists represent their stories in a positive informative way.

The websites ranged from advanced programs to easy to use beginner-friendly web tools. Tools like the Freedom of Information Act Machine and Data Portals helped journalists during the reporting process, and Carto and Giphy Capture were specialized for unique visuals.

No. 1 Take-Away: Data Portals and the U.S. Census Reporter are reliable and easy to use resources for finding data and information on sources and events beforehand.

No. 2 Take-Away: DataBasic.io is an amazing website that has webtools for beginners. It has features like a word counter that analyzes text and tells you the most common words and phrases used and a program that shows how your data is connected by analyzing it as a network.

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Workshop #3 

Who: Nick Kenig, LinkedIn

What: Establishing Your Professional Brand with a Strong LinkedIn Profile

Where: Pacific N, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 1:30 p.m.

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Workshop #4

Who: Marvin Pena and Diana Aristizabal, Clark College

What: Can You Hear Me Now?: Creating New Media Outlets

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 2:30 p.m.

 

Pena and Aristizabal ran a seminar on their step-by-step process to creating a new publication designed to serve an underrepresented group at the college. The 6-step-process encourages other journalists to make a difference in their community.

Pena said the method can be adapted to specific situations as necessary. He and Aristizabal created their media outlet, Mundo Clark, to “bridge cultures and serve different communities.” A new media outlet simply begins with an idea, he said, and it can make a difference.

No. 1 Take-Away: Finding partners can be beneficial. Mundo Clark works together with the Spanish department to use the publication as a means of learning for those classes.

No. 2 Take-Away: Involvement in college activities like news publications can help better yourself. You spend more time on campus and form relationships when you work on a project.

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Workshop #5 

Who: Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center, and  Sindhu Ravuri, University of California

What: Activating Women’s Voices

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 9 a.m.

 

LoMonte and Ravuri’s seminar was a promotion of the Active Voice Program, a place to bring young women together and elevate their voices. Women’s voices are censored in the media, significantly more than men’s. The presentation also pointed towards the program’s goal of deconstructing gender roles in all aspects of life.

Ravuri connected journalism and STEM in her speech. She said, STEM journalists are a marginalized group that needs support and attention. Women in STEM are often discriminated against through stereotype threats, implicit bias and a growth mindset rather than a fixed mindset. Ravuri ended the seminar with solutions for these issues.

 

No. 1 Take-Away: You can make a difference. When you see microaggressions against women, stop it. Mentor those who look up to you, and build a positive network.

No. 2 Take-Away: Growth versus Fixed mindset makes a big difference. A growth mindset is important to continue to learn and grow as a journalist and as a person. A fixed mindset will only hold you back.

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Worshop #6

Who: Michael Koretzky, Society of Professional Journalists

What: Editor-in-Grief 2: Ten Secrets of Very Sexy Editors

Where: Pacific J, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 10 a.m.

 

Koretzy’s workshop was about his 10 ways an “editor-in-grief” can fix their newsroom’s problems.  He stressed that there are no magic words to make everything work better than before; you must do something different, not just say something different. He also stressed the value of facing problems as the editor-in-chief. You will learn and grow more as you are forced to problem solve.

Koretzy’s fifth point addressed the five editor fears. Fears that the newsroom is full of anarchists, people who wanted your position and are now enemies, and fears about an unexperienced newsroom. He said the key to being a successful editor is to defeat these fears.

No. 1 Take-Away: As an editor-in-chief, if you feel like you’re working with people who always give you a hard time, or those who wanted your job and are having a hard time accepting defeat, give them their own territory. Put them in charge of a section or area of the paper so that they can feel wanted and you can have relief.

No. 2 Take-Away: You want to mess up. Embrace the problems and learn from them, you’ll have more growth to show in the end.

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Workshop #7

Who: Jennifer Burger, California State University,

What: Writing to Be Read

Where: Pacific K, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 2:30 p.m.

 

Burger’s hands-on workshop focused on the basics of newswriting. She said a successful story must have the three S’s: story, structure and style.

Finding the story is ultimately equivalent to securing a news peg. A reporter must find out the surface of what the story is about, then find the deeper meaning. The structure of a story is an inverted trapezoid, Burger’s rendition of the traditional pyramid. Last, the style forces the reporter to choose between an alternative news lede or a basic news lede.

No. 1 take-away: Subheadings help the reader along through the story. Utilize them to make the story more reader-friendly.

No. 2 take-away: Always write your own headlines. You know your story best.

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Andy Bao --- Photo Editor, Uncategorized

Andy Bao: Workshops

 

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Workshop #1 

Who: Mark Murrmann, Mother Jones Magazine

What: Photojournalism and Documentary Photos for Magazines

Where: Pacific I, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 9 a.m.

 

Mark Murrmann, photo editor for Mother Jones Magazine, talked to students on March 3 about how magazines work with photojournalists and documentary photographers. Murrmann emphasized maintaining a long-term relationship with editors even after moving on from the position.

Murrmann reminded everyone not to send editors photos you don’t want in print. Some magazines are stricter than others when it comes to photo styles.

 

No. 1 Take-Away: Learn more portraits.

No. 2 Take-Away: Black and white is okay.

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Workshop #2

Who: Nick Kenig, LinkedIn

What: Establishing Your Professional Brand with a Strong LinkedIn Profile

Where: Pacific N, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 1:30 p.m.

 

If LinkedIn were to be summarized in three words, it would be “Connect to Opportunity.” Nick Kenig from LinkedIn demonstrated to students the importance and wide-spread use of LinkedIn in the work field on Friday.

Kenig stressed the importance of using LinkedIn to control what future employers find about applicants, not their Facebook. Five must-have fields on your LinkedIn page include education, a photo, your job experience, volunteer experience and skills.

 

No. 1 Take-Away: Qualify your short-term jobs.

No. 2 Take-Away: Your Alumni base is very important.

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Workshop #3

Who: Bradley Wilson, Midwestern State University

What: Advisers and Photojournalists: The Tango

Where: Pacific O, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 2:30 p.m.

 

Bradley Wilson from Midwestern University talked to advisers and photojournalists about working together on March 3. Wilson covered topics from giving assignments to uploading photos.

Wilson worked through different newsroom problems with advisers during the workshop, including managing students and going over equipment responsibilities.

 

No. 1 Take-Away: Three minutes to get to know the person, two minutes for the photo.

No. 2 Take-Away: Check copyright information and photo rights.

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Workshop #4

Who: Deniz Ergurel, Haptical, Inc.

What: How Virtual Reality Can Transform Media

Where: Pacific L, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 3:30 p.m.

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Workshop # 5

Who: Jay Hartwell, University of Hawaii at Manoa

What: Reformatting Print/Web Content for Social Media Engagement

Where: Pacific K, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 10 a.m.

 

Jay Hartwell brought his social media formatting experience to his workshop on March 4. Hartwell emphasized the importance of engagement in social media outreach.

The ending portion of the workshop was reserved for critiques. This included talking about the logos used on social media, headlines and cropping photos.

 

No. 1 Take-Away: Remember you can use user generated content photos if you talk to them.

No. 2 Take-Away: Check to see if we can use AP Images or if we have before.

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Workshop #6

Who: Scott Strazzante, San Francisco Chronicle

What: Sports Photography: Avoiding the Cliché

Where: Pacific M, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 1:30 p.m.

 

Famous for his sports photography, Scott Strazzante gave a workshop about the sports photography field and how to stand out from the saturated market. Every photographer at a sports event has the same chance to get “the” photo.

Strazzante reminded everyone that there’s a lot of luck involved in sports photography, such as if the big play occurs facing away from the photographer. Sometimes the best shots aren’t always the action photos. The best photos should have significance for the event.

 

No. 1 Take-Away: Always take a detail shot.

No. 2 Take-Away: More fan photos.

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Workshop #7 

Who: Scott Strazzante, San Francisco Chronicle

What: Photojournalism: Finding Your Voice

Where: Pacific M, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 2:30 p.m.

 

From the San Francisco Chronicle, photojournalist Scott Strazzante talks about some of his favorite stories he’s covered over the years. There are many tricks to use, including silhouettes and other clichés like panning.

Strazzante reminded attendees that a photostory should have three parts and include an arc. Some photostories can fit in a thematic grid form for a gallery or a collage.

 

No. 1 Take-Away: Make sure there’s an arc in your photo story.

 

No. 2 Take-Away: Reward your paper with unique photos.

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Workshop # 8

Who: Tim O’Brien, Hadal, Inc

What: Photography by Drone: Common Pitfalls, the Limits, and How to Push Them

Where: Pacific O, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 3:30 p.m.

Elliott C. Lang --- Online Editor, Uncategorized

Elliott C Lang: Workshops

 

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Workshop #1

Who: Erica Perel, University of North Carolina, Steve Chappell, Northwest Missouri State University

What: Social Media and Audience Engagement

Where: Pacific L, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3rd, 1 p.m.

This workshop showed how important media engagement with the your audience or reader is. Both  Erica Perel and Steve Chappell showed the nearly packed room about the different tools they can use to engage readers and make them feel more apart of the production process.

Perel and Chappell asked many of the young news journalists about the different ways they try to engage readers, while showing us ways to bring in new readers and how to hone our current methods. By using tools like online polls, we can engage readers and keep them interested in the site.

No. 1 Take-Away:  Use polls, surveys, and interesting questions to engage online readers.

No. 2 Take-Away: Ask your school about having a live forum to engage the local community on political and social issues.

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Workshop #2

Who: Audrey Cooper, San Francisco Chronicle

What: Transformation of the San Francisco Chronicle

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 4 p.m.

Audrey Cooper is the first female editor in chief in the Chronicle’s history. She came to the convention to share some of her insights and stories about the guts and glory of being in journalism and what it takes to do in-depth reporting. Being one of the youngest editors ever named to the top of a major news outlet, Cooper explained where journalism stands in today’s  world of fake news and how important it is to not lose sight of why journalism must remain a pillar of a free society.

In one of her stories, she shared just what in-depth looks like. She spoke about how one of their reporters went deep undercover by becoming homeless for two weeks so that he could live amongst those who are less fortunate. Through this, they were able to highlight key issues with the city’s method of dealing with the homeless and bring awareness to the public.

No. 1 Take-Away:  Sometimes you need to get dirty to get the story.

No. 2 Take-Away: Don’t give up, but also realize when you need to take a step back and analyze another approach to what you’re doing.

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Workshop #3

Who: Barbara Kingsley-Wilson, California State University

What: Interview Anybody About Anything

Where: Pacific H, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 9 a.m.

Barbara Kingsley-Wilson engaged every student with interesting advice: shut up and stop trying to fill silences with your own voice. The 20-year-veteran of journalism shared some of her advice for interviewing to the young journalists that attended her seminar

Wilson said that letting the interviewee talk can bring about some powerful possibilities. “Most people love to talk,” said Wilson as she reiterated that being quiet can let subject fill that void with words. If it was an important interview, the interviewee can lead themselves to a slip up which could be headline material.

No. 1 Take-Away: Be silent and listen when interviewing, but also be aware when you need  transition the interview in a new direction.

No. 2 Take-Away: Reporters should ask questions that bring about the reason, obstacle and how the interviewee triumphed over it.  

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Workshop #4

Who: Lucio Villa, San Francisco Chronicle

What: Full Stacked Journalist: How you can do it all

Where: Pacific N, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 10 a.m.

Lucio Villa explained how reporters can find stories through data mining, as well as what websites you can use to find information to either beef up your current story or find a new story to pitch.

Through sites such as OpenDataSoft.com, Data.gov, FOIAMachine.com and Carto.com. Villa explained that you can not only mine for data, but also use the tools on some of these websites to bring that data to life. This can be used to bring color and a fresh view to your website, along with a fun way of viewing any boring data you need for your story

No. 1 Take-Away: It doesn’t take a computer genius to mine data and find the right info for a story.

No. 2 Take-Away: Make sure you add flare to whatever data you use. Boring data tells a boring story and doesn’t engage your reader.

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Workshop #5

Who: Kurt Eichenwald Newsweek, Vanity Fair and the New York Times

What: Investigating Donald Trump and Investigative Reporting for College Journalists

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March  4, 11 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.

With a packed auditorium, Kurt Eichenwald remarked his love for diet Pepsi, and after explaining a bit about his journalistic past covering Donald Trump, he proceeded to explain how much the audience might not like what he was about to say. “Bernie Sanders supporters were some of the nastiest supporters of this election,” said Eichenwald. After hearing some mumbling from the audience, Eichenwald explained some of the threats both he and his family received because of his criticism of Sanders’ campaign. He talked about how the job can bring about possible danger, but said that in this day and age, it is more important than ever to keep being critical towards those in power, even if threats are made. He was also critical of the media calling them lazy and said it was part of why we have such a toxic political scene right now.

He went on to talk about Donald Trump and how he had covered his business dealings with Cuba during the embargo and some of the things Trump has done since winning the election. In a later meeting with students, Eichenwald continued off his earlier speech. He talked about what it takes to really investigate a story, how it’s okay to not know a subject or individual and how to use that to learn for both you and the reader.

After the two workshops, I had the pleasure of speaking to Mr. Eichenwald for about 10 minutes about journalism and politics today. After a handshake and a smile, I asked him if he would be interested in reading some of the Indy’s stories and maybe give us some pointers for the future. He said yes and the Indy now has his email for future endeavors.

I am quite thankful for Clark in allowing us to go to this convention. Good things have happened, and it was nice to see what the future for journalism looks like!

No. 1 Take-Away: Don’t give up and don’t be lazy. Check your sources once, twice and then again.

No. 2 Take-Away: Don’t be afraid to be dumb about a subject. Think of it a as a learning experience and take it on.

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Trey Wilkins-Luton --- Life Editor, Uncategorized

Trey Wilkins-Luton: Workshops

 

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Workshop #1

Who: Barbara Kingsley-Wilson, California State University

What:  Interview Anybody About Anything

Where: Pacific H, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 9 a.m.

Barbara Kingsley-Wilson, a professor and adviser at California State University, delivered a presentation on the art of interviewing from 9-9:50 a.m on March 4 in Pacific H. She focused her session on what to do, as well as what to avoid, when performing interviews.

I decided to attend this seminar since I knew that interviews were one of my weak points. I wanted to learn how to feel more comfortable in interviews, and I also wanted to learn how to efficiently get the information I want from sources.

No. 1 Take-Away:  Your interview is about your source, not you. Be quiet and let them do the talking.

No. 2 Take-Away: Always ask for the details. Even if it feels inconsequential at the time, be sure to get all the info you can.

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Workshop #2

Who: Mark Plenke, California State University

What:  Coaching Writers

Where:  Pacific H, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 10 a.m.

Mark Plenke, lecturer at California State University and adviser to The Orion,  delivered a seminar all about coaching writers from 10-10:50 a.m. on March 3 in Pacific H. He focused specifically on how editors can help their reporters during the initial reporting stages of story. As part of the workshop, Plenke had us work with partners to plan a story.

I attended this session because working with reporters is an important part of my job. I spend a lot of my time as an editor working with my reporters on sourcing, planning and focus long before they place words on a page, so I thought that this seminar would teach me more about this process.

No. 1 Take-Away: A lot can be done in little time. We only had 50 minutes to create our stories, but I managed to create a potentially newsworthy outline in that short timeframe.

No. 2 Take-Away: Rough drafts are allowed to be bad. I was nervous about trying to write something outstanding in only a few minutes, but I learned that it is okay to not have a flawless first draft. My first few paragraphs could have been much better, but my partner helped me revise them into something that I felt good about.  

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Workshop #3

Who: Nick Kenig, LinkedIn

What: Establishing Your Professional Brand with a Strong LinkedIn Profile

Where: Pacific N, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 1:30 p.m.

Nick Kenig, enterprise relationship manager at LinkedIn, delivered a seminar on creating a professional LinkedIn profile from 1:30-2:20 p.m. on March 3 in Pacific N. This session focused specifically on what a college student should and shouldn’t include on his or her profile, as well as how they should include that information.

I attended this seminar because I knew next to nothing about how to properly use LinkedIn. I didn’t know if I should include things like short summer jobs, and I didn’t know how many skills I should include on my profile. After attending this seminar, I feel much more sure of my ability to create a profile that will attract potential employers.

No. 1 Take-Away: Creating a professional looking profile is essential to attracting employers.

No. 2 Take-Away: I have to be careful of what I post online. Employers will check all of my social media, so I must keep those as professional as I can.

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Workshop #4

Who: Marvin Pena and Diana Aristizabal, Clark College

What: Can You Hear Me Know?: Creating New Media Outlets

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 2:30 p.m.

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Workshop #5

Who: Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center, and Sindhu Ravuri, University of California Berkeley

What:  Activating Women’s Voices

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 9 a.m.

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Workshop #6

Who:  Michael Koretzky, Society of Professional Journalists

What:  Editor-in-Grief 2: Ten Secrets of Very Sexy Editors

Where: Pacific J, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 10 a.m.

Michael Koretzky, adviser to The University Press for 12 years, delivered a seminar on the secrets to being a good editor from 10-10:50 a.m. on March 4. in Pacific J. He shared tips based on what he’s learned from his experience as both an editor and an adviser.

Steven Mitchell --- Advertising Manager, Uncategorized

Steven Mitchell: Workshops

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Workshop #1

Who: Barbara Kingsley-Wilson, California State University

What: Interview Anybody About Anything

Where: Pacific H, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 9 a.m.

California State University, Long Beach’s Barbara Kingsley-Wilson, professor and adviser to the campus newspaper, the Daily 49er, shared some of her 20-years of interviewing experience during Saturday morning’s session. Kingsley-Wilson’s advice to student journalists is to shut-up, resist the urge to fill the silence, research the background of your story and know what you’re going to ask your source.

Kingsley-Wilson said there is a spiritual component to interviewing people – listening, observing and being empathetic is key to getting a source to open up to you.

Reporters who have genuine curiosity can interview anybody about anything, according to Kingsley-Wilson. All a reporter has to do, is ask someone about a goal they had, the obstacle they faced, the solution they found to overcome the obstacle and get their start.

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Workshop #2

Who: Marvin Pena and Diana Aristizabal, Clark College

What: Can You Hear Me Now? Creating A New Media Outlet

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 2:30 p.m.

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Workshop #3

Who: Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center, and  Sindhu Ravuri, University of California

What: Activating Women’s Voices

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 9 a.m.

The Student Press Law Center formed the Active Voice Fellows, college students paid to press freedom projects in their communities. Active Voice started in response to to research out of the University of Kansas in March 2016, that high school girls report direct institutional censorship and pressure to self censor.

Sindhu Ravuri, a sophomore at University of California, Berkeley, gave a wide-ranging talk about discrimination within STEM and said in many instances these cases are underreported.   Ravuri presented examples of biased articles from Breitbart News, Fox and the Wall Street Journal.

 

No. 1 Take-Away: Stereotype threat – a concept in social psychology where someone begins to believe the stereotypes attributed to their group.      

No. 2 Take-Away: Ravuri talked about the importance of culture within newsrooms and how it might affect women. While I did not agree with her on forcing people to sit together at lunch; promoting inclusive culture is a good practice.

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Workshop #3

Who: Kristen Griffith and Brittany Wilson, Wesley College

What: Yes, there is a First Amendment at Private Colleges: Writing Stories That Matter When They Say You Can’t

Where: Pacific O, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 10 a.m.

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Workshop #4

Who: Kurt Eichenwald, Newsweek, Vanity Fair and the New York Times.

What: Investigative Journalism for College Journalists

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 3:20 p.m.

After his keynote speech, veteran reporter Kurt Eichenwald lectured a packed room of 50 to 70 student journalists on the ins-and-outs of investigative reporting to close out the third day of the convention.

Through anecdotes from 20-years of reporting on torture at Guantanamo Bay, the Enron scandal and his coverage of the 2016 election, Eichenwald said interviewing sources and actually listening set him apart from other journalists. According to Eichenwald, this is why he was able to get sources to sit down with him. “People are willing to have their warts shown if you report on them in a fair and balanced way, “ Eichenwald said.

No. 1 Take-Away: Facts that lead you to wrong conclusion are still true. Bob shot Tom and Tom died is a fact, but an incorrect conclusion. Bob shot Tom and Tom died 40-years later from cancer caused from the wound is the correct conclusion.

No. 2 Take-Away: The Dunning and Kruger Effect: Smarter people recognize the enormity of what they don’t know. The less intelligent think they know everything

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Michael Larsen-Teeters --- Sports Editor, Uncategorized

Michael Larsen-Teeters: Workshops

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Workshop #1

Who: Rachele Kangel

What: Diversity in Today’s Newsroom

Where: Pacific O, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 2, 1 p.m.

This session opened journalists’ eyes to predominantly Caucasian newsrooms. Rachele Kangel challenged journalists to participate in exercises that revealed society’s natural racial biases and stereotypes.

Kangel encouraged the participants to look past society’s racial biases when interviewing journalists for newsroom jobs. She was accompanied by guests from the Asian American Journalists Association and the National Association of Black Journalists to emphasize a diverse perspective on journalism.

No. 1 Take-Away: Realizing for the first time that there is a lack of diversity in most newsrooms.

No. 2 Take-Away: I made a plan to target more diverse communities in my story pitches.

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Workshop #2

Who: Barbara Kingsley-Wilson, California State University

What: Interview Anybody About Anything

Where: Pacific H, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 9 a.m.

Barbara Kingsley-Wilson’s session addressed common journalist flaws in interviewing and gave tips on how to fix them. Kingsley-Wilson told attendees to research the subject before and interview and have questions prepared.

She continued to add tips to perform better interviews, such as letting awkward silences exist. When there is an awkward silence in-between note-taking, the interviewee typically adds information.

No. 1 Take-Away: Extend awkward silences.

No. 2 Take-Away: Turn close ended questions into open ended ones. Can you elaborate? Why do you feel that way? I don’t understand.

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Workshop #3

Who: Mark Plenke, California State University

What: Coaching Writers

Where: Pacific H, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 10 a.m.

Mark Plenke orchestrated an exercise, the poynter method, to create a story idea and a solid portion of that story in under 30 minutes. Plenke had attending journalists team up with a partner to develop story ideas, outlines and nearly half a story.

The session revealed an astonishingly quick exercise to make a whole story that may be implemented into newsrooms around the world.

No. 1 Take-Away: Don’t think. Just write.

No. 2 Take-Away: All it takes is sitting down with a partner for thirty minutes.

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Workshop #4

Who: Nick Kenig, LinkedIn

What: Establishing Your Professional Brand with a Strong LinkedIn Profile

Where: Pacific N, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 1:30 p.m.

Journalists at this session learned that there is a Student LinkedIn that student journalists can join. Kenig revealed that 480 million people are currently on LinkedIn and nine out of ten job recruiters use LinkedIn.

Nick Kenig also showcased his love for photography and journalism and told the attendees how those helped him to acquire a job at LinkedIn.

No. 1 Take-Away: Join LinkedIn

No. 2 Take-Away: LinkedIn helps people acquire jobs every day.

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Workshop #5

Who: Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center, and  Sindhu Ravuri, University of California

What: Activating Women’s Voices

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 9 a.m.

Sindhu Ravuri empowered women to fight for equal treatment in newsrooms and to push through censorship. Ravuri pointed towards stereotype threats, implicit bias and growth against a fixed mindset as reasons for discrimination against women in the newsroom.

She told attendees to find a mentor who supports you and your vision for yourself. Without that, women in the newsroom will not reach their highest potential.

No. 1 Take-Away: Grow through my implicit bias towards women.

No. 2 Take-Away: Encourage women to push through censorship.

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Workshop #6

Who: Michael Koretzky, Society of Professional Journalists

What: Editor-in-Grief 2: Ten Secrets of Very Sexy Editors

Where: Pacific J, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 10 a.m.

Michael Koretzky expressed his views on what a student run newspaper should look like and how student journalists can achieve that quality of reporting/writing. The session was meant to target editor-in-chiefs and the issues they have controlling their newsroom.

Koretzky advised editor-in-chiefs to be more strict with their staff and take a disciplined approach to management. Despite the name this was a serious session.

No. 1 Take-Away: The look of the paper isn’t super important. The content matters more.

No. 2 Take-Away: Recruit the help of alumni to help your student newspaper publication.

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Workshop #7

Who: Kim Bui, University of Southern California

What: Covering Abroad from Afar

Where: Pacific N, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 1:30 p.m.

Kim Bui helped attending journalists develop a strategy to cover stories from abroad. Student journalists will be successful whilst traveling abroad by using her three-step process: find a social source, contact them and get on the ground.

Kim Bui also went through a detailed description of her experiences abroad and encouraged student journalists to travel abroad, but also to be weary of the monetary costs.

No. 1 Take-Away: Find a source before traveling abroad

No. 2 Take-Away: Be aware of the monetary costs of such a venture.

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Workshop #8

Who: Kurt Eichenwald, Newsweek and Vanity Fair

What: Investigative Reporting for College Journalists

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 3:30 p.m.

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Workshop #9

Who: Marvin Pena and Diana Aristizábal Velásquez, Clark College

What: Can You Hear Me Now?: Creating New Media Outlets

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 2:30 p.m.

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Marvin Peña --- Mundo and Circulation Editor, Uncategorized

Marvin Peña: Workshops

Marvin Pena

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Workshop #1

Who: Pek Pongpaet, Impekable

What: Design for Content Based Application

Where: Pacific J, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 9 a.m.

In this workshop Pek Pongpaet emphasized how consumers of information obtain it from digital devices, no longer from paper. He pointed out the different times people are connected, but also said through what device people are connecting. He said it is important to know how to present stories based on where and who they could be seen by.

Also, pongpaet talked about the importance of social media in this information consumption society. Facebook was the number one source to be mentioned in the course. Having this in mind, the speaker mentioned the importance of having a website and social media.

 

No. 1 Take-Away: Design to be seen in different platforms.

No. 2 Take-Away: Know your audience to know when and where to publish.

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Workshop #2

Who: Piper Jackson, Sevy, Flytedesk

What: Vendor session: Networking, Résumés and Interviews

Where: Pacific I, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 10 a.m.

This workshop was about the importance of being prepared when it comes to networking and relating with people. It is important to be prepared because it reduces the tension you might feel in new situations. Be ready to share what you have to give before asking for any favors. Then ask for the help you need.

Piper Jackson also emphasized the importance of having a résumé that is one page because recruiters only take 60 seconds to look them over. Focus on and highlight your skills, then tailor your cover letter for the job you want. Using words from the job description can also increase your chances to obtain the job, Jackson said.

No. 1 Take-Away: Take the time to prepare a resume to increase your success of finding a job.

No. 2 Take-Away: Be concise with your words and avoid long resumes. Focus on your main skills.

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Workshop #3

Who: Barbara Kingsley-Wilson, Micayla Vermeeren and Miranda Andrade-Ceja, California State University, Long Beach.

What: Leaving it Better Than You Found it.

Where: Pacific M, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 1:30 p.m.

This workshop was based on how to handle transitions in the newsroom. Specifically, how to work with the classmates you are going to replace and making a smoother change that doesn’t disrupt the flow of the newsroom.

The speakers discussed the importance of shadowing your predecessor as much as possible because it will allow you to learn quickly and take over the position with more confidence.

Don’t hesitate to ask for help in the training process, this will help you understand everything around you quickly. They reminded everyone that is important to delegate tasks, not just to allow you to work on other stories, but also to give you a new perspective.

No. 1 Take-Away: It is important to realize that you can’t do it all. It is important to have an assistant or someone to help out.

No. 2 Take-Away: It is important to know when a story is going to get cut and recognize that prior production day.  

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Workshop #4

Who: Marvin Peña and Diana Aristizabal

What: Can You Hear Me Now?: Creating New Media Outlets

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 3, 2:30 p.m.

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Workshop #5

Who: Toni Albertson

What: Journalism as Mad Science

Where: Pacific M, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 9 a.m.

At this workshop Toni Albertson refers to journalism as a science of trial and error. Albertson said to constantly trying new ways of engaging readers is important. She said that there is no better motivation than knowing your stories are being read.

She said to check where readers are coming from and analyze news closely in order to generate content that matters to your audience. Recognize this and go directly to the audience to look for the stories. Try new things and try to be informed about what is going on campus. Talking to students is important to find those stories that matter, Albertson said.

No. 1 Take-Away: Sometimes the stories are not stories. No one cares. Focus on what matters to the people.

No. 2 Take-Away: Rethink the story. Maybe change the picture and headline. A fresh picture and more catchy headline can change it all.

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Workshop #6

Who: Jay Hartwell, University of Hawaii

What: Reforming Print/Web Content for Social Media Engagement

Where: Pacific K, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 10 a.m.

Jay Hartwell started the presentation focusing on the new ways to measure engagement through clicks and shares. Images are the key of that engagement, he said. Make your pictures work for social media and not just for print. Take different shots that appealing the reader on social media.

He said that headlines must pull people in and be specific, true to the story and less than 90 characters. He also said video is a powerful way to promote a piece.

Captions and descriptions should be social media friendly, and not repetitive. Hartwell finished with pictures and logos. A Logo, he said,  needs to be suited for social media and stories should always have a picture. Pictures add valuable information and engage readers.

No. 1 Take-Away: Be conscious of the pictures you take and think about what is appealing for your social media audience.

No. 2 Take-Away: Be concise and use strong verbs to draw attention for the faster social media reader.

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Workshop #7

Who:  Kurt Eichenwald, Newsweek, Vanity Fair and the New York Times.

What: Keynote Speaker: Investigating Trump

Where: Grand A, Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 11 a.m.

“Reality was twisted” With that phrase Kurt Eichenwald started his speech. He said that reporting is difficult and people don’t want to hear a reality from different point of views.

Facts can be used to sell falsehoods, he said. Use the Democratic National Convention scandal as an example, he said, that it was based on things that are not fact. All emails were dated after Hillary Clinton won the candidacy.

Eichenwald also emphasized that journalists should stop conspiracy theories and seek the truth before making judgement. Dig in in the statements and facts.

He said that President Donald Trump will be the most conflicted president in the history due to his business overseas. We are at a point that reporters are not reporters. Most of them don’t understand the country’s realities, he said.

“I want to make sure people have the information to make better decisions. If you need to save space you are not a journalist.” He said.

No. 1 Take-Away: If you don’t know what you are talking about, you have no right to have an opinion that is not based on true facts.

No. 2 Take-Away: You need reporting. Reporting needs effort. Agreeing with something is not journalism. You need to base everything on facts. Journalists need to be accurate and fair, we don’t need to tell the truth.

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Workshop #8

Who: Mark Witherspoon, Iowa State Daily

What: Let’s Talk Diversity Without Screaming at Each Other

Where: Pacific K , Hyatt Regency San Francisco

When: March 4, 1:30 p.m.

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